Crinkled Seam Binding

Hi everyone!

Today I want to show you how to create your own crinkled seam binding. Smooth, flat ribbons are pretty of course but this crinkled version adds a fun texture to your paper crafting, wreaths or even sewing projects. Also, soaking the seam binding in a tea solution before scrunching will give it a nice vintage look if that is what you are looking for.

 

You will need: seam binding, scissors, spray bottle with water, baggie, craft sheet {or anything waterproof to do the spraying on. Even a sink will do}.

 

Cut a length of seam binding {a metre or so is a good amount to work with}.
Dampen lightly by spraying it with water (be sure that it is not too wet).
Scrunch up the seam binding into a ball.
 Stuff it into the corner of the baggie and tie the baggie shut.
 Let it dry over night and in the morning take the seam binding out of the baggie. Now, fluff up the seam binding and let it finish drying if it is still a wee bit damp.
Now your crinkled seam binding is ready to embellish all sorts of projects 🙂
I hope you enjoyed this tutorial.

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Until next time,

Erin

The Country Touch

Website: http://www.thecountrytouch.weebly.com

Email: ctrytch@telus.net

Calender Corkboard

Hi everyone!

Today I have a fun project for you ~ a calendar corkboard. These compact little calendars can be used anywhere in your home ~ on a desk, kitchen counter or night stand. Because they use basic supplies, a few can be created to coordinate with your décor. So let’s get started shall we?

 

You will need: chipboard, patterned paper, cutting tools of choice, adhesive, corner rounder, sanding block or nail buffer, 1/8″ hole punch or crop-a-dile, ribbon, calendar print outs {links below}, stapler or brads, paper piercer/piercing mat {if using brads}, eyelets/eyelet setter or crop-o-dile. ∗Please note: if you don’t have chipboard, don’t fret. Cardboard packaging, like a cereal box will work just fine. Just be sure that whatever you use is a little on the thicker side. This will make it easier for the calendar to stand nicely.

 

#1} Download and print off the PDF calendars. Thank you to http://www.print-a-calendar.com for their free downloads! calendar1   and   calendar2

 

 

 

#2} Cut apart into months. Mine ended up measuring 3″ high x 3 1/2″ wide.

 

 

#3} Stack the months lining up the edges. Staple on each end close to the top or just one staple above the month. Or, if you are using brads, measure and make two pencil marks where you want the brads to go. I measured in/down 1/4″ each way. Pierce holes with a paper piercer/mat.

 

 

#4}  Add brads. Cut a backing mat about 1/8″ larger that the calendar all the way around and adhere calendar to it. ∗Please note: Once 2018 is here, just download, print off, cut and stack the new months. Carefully remove the old calendar and adhere the new stack to the mat to enjoy your calendar for another year.

 

 

#5} Cut two chipboard pieces and four patterned paper pieces {two for the front/back and two for the insides}. I just have two patterned paper pieces shown to fit in the picture. Round the corners, if desired. The measurements for both are 4″ x 5 1/2″.

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#6} Adhere patterned paper to all four sides and lightly sand edges to smooth. On the outside of the front piece and the back piece, measure 3/8″ down and 3/4″ in towards the center, make pencil marks and punch holes with a hole punch. Add eyelets.

 

 

#7} Add some foam adhesive to the back of the calendar mat and adhere to front patterned paper/chipboard piece. Cut a piece of cork that measures 3 3/4″ x 1 1/2″. The cork I used was just thick enough that it wouldn’t fit in the corner rounder so I rounded the corners with small scissors instead. Adhere below calendar. ∗Please note: because the cork is thinner than a typical corkboard, it’s best to use the smallest thumbtacks you can find.

 

 

#8} Put the front and back together, add ribbons through eyelets, tie into knots or bows and trim off the excess. There you go! You now have a pretty little calendar to put anywhere in your home 🙂

 

I hope you enjoyed todays tutorial. As always, please feel free to share what you create!

 

 

 

*Please feel free to sign up as a follower to receives updates by email so you don’t miss a thing!

 

 

 

Until next time,

Erin

The Country Touch

Website: http://www.thecountrytouch.weebly.com

Email: ctrytch@telus.net

Korker Ribbon

Hi everyone!

Today’s tutorial is for making korker ribbon. Korker ribbon is similar to ringlets in appearance and is typically used for little girls hair bows. However, I thought that it could also be used for paper crafting as well ~ bows for packages/gift bags, wedding/baby albums and even cards.

You will need: 3/8″ ribbon, 1/4″ dowels {no longer than the width of the oven}, clothespins or twine, cookie sheet, oven. Please note: you can use different widths of ribbon/dowels depending on the look you are going for. Also, if you don’t have any dowels, a wooden spoon works just fine ~ you just can’t get as much ribbon on it. I also used a narrow ribbon and wooden skewer to get a smaller corker ribbon.

 

  1. Preheat your oven to 275º F.
  2. Lightly dampen the ribbon with water.
  3. Place the ribbon at the top of the dowel and secure it in place with a clothespin/twine.
  4. While twisting the dowel with your right hand, guide the ribbon with your left hand thumb/forefinger onto the dowel. Be sure to not to leave spaces in between the ribbon or overlap it. The edges of ribbon should just be touching.
  5. Once you are at the end of the dowel, use the other clothespin/twine to secure the ribbon end.
  6. Lay the dowel/dowels on the edges of a cookie sheet and place on the middle rack. I rested the clothespins/dowel ends on the edges of the cookie sheet so the ribbon was not in direct contact with the sheet. I thought this might prevent scorching.

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7.  Bake at 275º F for about 25 minutes. Watch closely and reduce temperature if necessary.    ∗Please note: because ovens do vary, you may have to adjust the temperature and baking time.

8.  Remove from oven and let cool completely before undoing the clothes pins/twine and sliding the ribbon off.

You now have korker ribbon! Please feel free to share what you create with it 🙂

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*Please feel welcome to sign up as a follower to receives updates by email so you don’t miss a thing!

 

 

 

 

Until next time,

Erin

The Country Touch

Website: http://www.thecountrytouch.weebly.com

Email: ctrytch@telus.net

 

Rag Garland Tutorial

Hi everyone!

Today’s tutorial is for making a rag garland. Rag garlands are a fun and easy way to use up pieces of fabric that are just too small to be used for other projects. Depending on the fabrics that you use, they can be created for any room or season. A rag garland will look pretty draped above a head board, strung across a window, mantle, hutch or stair railings, and even as a decoration for a baby/wedding shower.

You will need: length of jute, yarn or ribbon {the length will determine how long you want the garland to be. Also, be sure to add at least an extra 12″ to the total length to allow for the hanging loops on each end, if you want them}, assorted cotton/flannel fabrics cut or torn into pieces about 5″ long by 1″ wide, rotary cutter/ruler/self healing mat or scissors.

#1} The amount of strips required for a garland depends on the desired finished length. I can’t give you an exact number of strips you will need but start with a good sized pile of them. You can always make more strips if you need them. Please note: the strips can be cut with scissors or with a rotary cutter/ruler/self healing mat. If you want a more rustic look, just tear them and you will end up with the frayed ends. To tear the strips, cut 1″ snips along the edge of the fabric{shown below}. This allows you to rip 1″ wide fabric widths and also results in a frayed edge. Cut the strips into 5″ long pieces.  Please note: separate the different fabrics into piles. This makes it easier when you start tying if they are semi-organized.

 

 

 

#2} Begin by making a loop on the first end of the jute. The loop can be as long as you want.

 

 

#3} Start tying the strips around the jute. The first strip will be beside the knot. Be sure the strips are touching so that no jute is showing. Keep tying on the fabric strips until your garland is as long as you want it. You can pull and discard any loose threads as you go.

 

 

#4} When you get close to the end, make another loop. Keep tying on strips until you reach the knot. If you find that some of the strips look uneven, you can snip little bits off of them until you are happy with how they all look. This garland turned out to be approximately 5 1/2′ long {not including the loops}.

I hope that you enjoyed today’s tutorial 🙂

 

Please note: a selection of rag garlands will be available at the Carstairs Artisan Market as well as on The Country Touch website very soon.

 

 

 

*Please feel welcome to sign up as a follower to receives updates by email so you don’t miss a thing!

 

 

 

Until next time!

Erin

The Country Touch

Website: http://www.thecountrytouch.weebly.com

Email: ctrytch@telus.net

Tiny Treat Bag

Hi everyone!

There are a few different treat bag dies on the market these days. But since I don’t own any of them, I made one without. Creating this treat bag would have been faster with the die I’m sure. But it came together quickly and I’m still pleased with the way it turned out. Maybe you might want to give it a try as well! Treat bags can be used for many occasions ~ birthday parties, wedding/baby shower favors, kids class gift exchanges and more. They can be left either as plain or as dressed up as you want 🙂

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tiny-treat-bag-pdf

 

You will need: a 5 3/4″  x 8″ sheet of card stock or patterned paper, scoring board, bone folder, paper trimmer or cutting tools of choice, adhesive. *Additional supplies may include card stock/patterned paper and whatever stamps/embellishments/extras needed to complete the intended design.

Please note: you may click on the link underneath the picture above for a PDF of these instructions.

 

Score the paper 1/2″ up from the bottom of the 8″ side. Then score it at 2-1/8″ on both of the 5 3/4″ sides.

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Fold on the score lines and crease with a bone folder.

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Along the bottom, cut off each bottom edge between the score lines. Slightly angle cut the corners of the bottom flap {this makes a cleaner looking fold}.

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Cut along the top edge with decorative scissors or a border die {optional}.Please note:  I used a small saucer and pencil to trace a curved line. Then with decorative scissors, cut along the traced line so that the front is just a bit lower than the back.

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Apply adhesive along the inside edge of one of the side panels and on the inside of the bottom flap.

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Fold over panel without adhesive and then fold over the panel with adhesive to adhere before folding up the bottom flap. Go over each fold with the bone folder to ensure nice crisp folds. There is your treat bag ~ now it’s time to decorate!

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Hints:

*Two holes could be punched at the top and ribbon or yarn threaded through for handles or to tie it shut.

 

 

 

*Please feel welcome to sign up as a follower to receives updates by email so you don’t miss a thing!

 

 

 

Until next time,

Erin

The Country Touch

Website: http://www.thecountrytouch.weebly.com

Email: ctrytch@telus.net

Handmade Paper

Hi everyone!

Making handmade paper is a pretty simple process. It’s also a great way to use up and recycle your old scraps of paper such as envelopes, junk mail and any other paper that you were ready to throw into the recycling bin. With just a few supplies you will be well on your way to making handmade paper for any of your paper crafting projects.

You will need: water, scrap papers, Rubbermaid bin, plastic dish tub or large roasting pan {big enough to hold the pulp/water and fit the mould & deckle}, *mould & deckle {instructions for creating this is found below}, blender, spoon, absorbent material such as towels, felt squares or chamois, iron, sponge or cloth, cutting board or cookie sheet. *Please note: I have not included a picture of all these supplies as there were too many big items to fit in one picture.

 

*Creating a mould and deckle:

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You can purchase a mold and deckle from an arts and crafts store or make one yourself. But regardless of which way you choose to do it, you must have one as it is a neccesary piece of equipment for paper making. The two pieces to the mould and deckle are:

the mould ~ this is a frame that has some type of screen attached

the deckle ~ this frame does not have a screen and when it is laid on top of the mould, it forms the edge of the piece of paper.

 

1} You will need: 2 – 8″ x 10″ frames, varnish/paintbrush {if they are not already sealed}, window screen mesh or plastic canvas, no-rust staples/staple gun, ruler, pencil, scissors, duct tape {optional}, foam weather strip tape.

2} If the frames have glass and a backing, remove them.

3} For the mould ~ Measure and cut a piece of mesh or canvas 1/4″ narrower and shorter than the frame.

4} Stretch taut and staple in place all the way around on the flattest side of the frame. *It is very important that the mesh/canvas is stretched tightly and evenly.

5} This step is optional {it just makes the finished piece a little neater looking}. Cover all four edges with duct tape but do not go past the inside edge of the frame. I didn’t do this for mine though.

6} For the deckle ~ Apply the foam weatherstrip tape to all four edges on the flatter side of the frame. This creates a tight seal and prevents the pulp from leaking out between the mould and deckle when you’re forming the sheets of paper.

The mould and deckle is now complete and ready for paper making!

 

Hints:

*I think a mould made with a screen would work better than the plastic canvas. The plastic canvas leaves some marks on the paper but I ironed it a bit and that seemed to help.

 

 

*Making the paper:

1} Choose the paper that will be used and tear into small pieces or run through a paper shredder. *Please note: if using mailing envelopes with clear windows, remove the clear plastic window before tearing up the envelope. Cover the paper pieces with hot water and let sit for 30 minutes to allow the paper to soak up some water.

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2} Put soaked paper/water mixture into the blender {about 2/3 full} and run the blender slowly at first, then increase the speed until the pulp looks smooth and well blended ~ about 30 -40 seconds. Check to make sure that no bits of paper remain whole. If there are, blend a bit longer.

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This is what the blended pulp should look like.

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3} Fill the Rubbermaid bin {what I used} about half way with water. Then add about 2 blender loads of pulp. *The more pulp you add to the water the thicker the finished paper will be. Stir the mixture well to combine and bring to the surface of the water.

*I apologize for the glare in some of these pictures ~ I was doing this at the kitchen sink and there is a window above it.

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4} Press the mould down into the pulp. Level it out while it is submerged by gently wiggling it from side to side until the pulp on top of the screen looks evenly spread out.

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5} Lift the mold up slowly until it is above the level of the water. If the paper seems too thick, submerge the mould back into the water and remove the pulp from the screen and stir the mixture. If the paper is too thin, add some more pulp and stir. Repeat step 4.

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6} After lifting the mould out of the water, tip it on an angle to drain off some water before laying it flat. When it stops dripping, gently place one edge onto the side of the absorbent material. Gently ease the mould down so that it is laying flat with the paper right on the fabric. Using a sponge or cloth, press out as much water as possible.

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7} While holding the edge of the fabric down flat, carefully and slowly lift the edge of the mould. The wet sheet of newly made paper should stay on the fabric. If it ends up sticking to the mold, it’s possible that not enough water was pressed out. Or maybe it was lifted up too quickly. Try pressing some more water out with the sponge or cloth and lift the mould.

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8} If more than one sheet of paper is needed, repeat all of the steps above until there are enough sheets.

9} Put the sheets on a cutting board or a cookie sheet individually. Place another cloth on top of the sheet and iron firmly to partially dry it. Then remove the cloth so that the paper can dry the rest of the way naturally. Placing the sheets outside in the sun or hanging them on a clothesline will dry them quickly but they will also dry indoors just fine. It will just take a little bit longer.

Congratulations! You’ve just created handmade paper 🙂

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Hints:

*To the pulp you may add natural items such as flower petals {as shown in the picture above}, leaves and pine needles. Or bits of colored paper and threads. Even glitter or tiny confetti will give some pretty sparkle and shimmer. These little extras add pretty color and texture. *Please note: Be sure to use these extras sparingly or the paper will not hold together properly.

 

 

 

I hope you enjoyed this tutorial. As always, please do not hesitate to contact me if you have any questions.

 

 

*Please feel welcome to sign up as a follower to receives updates by email so you don’t miss a thing!

 

 

 

Until next time,

Erin

The Country Touch

Website: http://www.thecountrytouch.weebly.com

Email: ctrytch@telus.net

Rusting Jingle Bells

Hi everyone!

Today I have a tutorial for rusting jingle bells, safety pins, stars and any other metal items. Now, I realize that this rusty look is not for everyone but if you like the primitive/country style, you might want to give this a try.

You will need: safety glasses, metal items to be rusted {jingle bells, safety pins, metal stars/hearts, etc.}, sand paper, glass jar with lid, stirring spoon, measuring cup/spoons, soft toothbrush, *rusting solution {recipe below}.

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*Please note:

~ Always wear safety glasses when working with and mixing any liquids.

~ Try not to breathe in any smell from the rusting solution if it gets foamy. It’s a good idea to turn on the stove fan or open a window.

 

*Rusting solution: 3/4 cup peroxide, 1/4 cup vinegar and 1 tablespoon of salt. Stir together until the salt dissolves. Depending on how large your jar is and how many items you are rusting, you can always double the amounts if you feel it’s neccesary.

 

#1} Give each metal item just a little bit of a sanding ~ this will remove some of the protective layer and get the rusting happening.

#2} *Put on the safety glasses when mixing and pouring the rusting solution. Add jingle bells/metal items to the jar. *Place the jar in the sink in case it foams over when the solution makes contact with the metal. Slowly pour in the rusting solution just a bit at a time {about 2 tbsp. at a time}. If foaming occurs, wait until it stops before adding more solution. Take care to completely cover metal items.  Once the foaming stops, put the lid on and gently turn to make sure all are thoroughly covered. *Be sure to completely rinse the sink and anything else the solution has been in contact with once this step is complete.

#3} Let sit for 24 – 48 hours.

#4} You can pour the used rusting solution down the drain or if you would prefer not to do that, place it in a disposable container for the trash. Leave the wet jingle bells/metal items in the jar with the lid off and put the jar out in the sun to dry. Or lay them on a paper towel lined piece of tin foil on a cookie sheet. The metal items items will start rusting as they dry.

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#5} Because there are holes in the jingle bells, the insides will also rust. When they are totally dry, tap 2 bells together and then shake out the rusty powder from the insides. This is best done outside or over the trash can. For all the now rusty items, use a soft toothbrush to brush off any rusty powder residue from the outsides.

#6} Your rusty items are now ready to add to crafting projects. Add rusty stars to a wreath, a jingle bell to a jar candle or snowman, or attach a tag with a rusty paper clip.

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Hints:

*If you want a bit of protection for your rusty items, lightly spray with matte finish and let dry thoroughly before using.

 

 

*Please feel welcome to sign up as a follower to receives updates by email so you don’t miss a thing!

 

 

Until next time,

Erin

The Country Touch

Website: http://www.thecountrytouch.weebly.com

Email: ctrytch@telus.net